8th June, 2000
Notice Board


COME ON DOUGLAS

INTER TOWN AND VILLAGE LITTER CHALLENGE 2000 LAUNCHED
THE CORK COUNTY INTER TOWN AND VILLAGE LITTER CHALLENGE FOR 2000 was Launched last FRIDAY, (2nd June) AT THE ROYAL GUNPOWDER MILLS,
BALLINCOLLIG. THE LAUNCH Was PERFORMED JOINTLY BY THE CATHAOIRLEACH OF CORK COUNTY COUNCIL, COUNCILLOR TOMAS RYAN AND THE MINISTER OF STATE AT THE DEPARTMENT OF THE Environment, MR.DAN WALLACE T.D.
THE COMPETITION IS NOW IN ITS FOURTH YEAR AND HAS ATTRACTED AN ENTRY OF 16 TOWNS AND 62 Villages. THE COMPETITION IS RUN ON A LEAGUE BASIS WITH EACH TOWN OR VILLAGE COMPETING AGAINST THE OTHERS IN ITS SECTION OVER A PERIOD OF EIGHT WEEKS. THE PRIZE Fund IS 20,000.
BOTH THE CATHAOIRLEACH AND THE MINISTER WARMLY WELCOMED THE Initiate AS YET ANOTHER WEAPON IN THE ONGOING WAR AGAINST LITTER "THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSE OF PRIDE IN OUR OWN LOCALITY Is Vital IN MAKING PEOPLE AWARE OF THE LITTER PROBLEM", SAID COUNCILLOR RYAN, "AND WHAT BETTER WAY IS THERE TO DEVELOP THAT SENSE OF PRIDE THAN BY A GOOD COMPETITION"
THE MINISTER ALSO WELCOMED THE COMPETITION AND PAID TRIBUTE TO THE COUNCIL FOR devising and running the competition over the last four years. He pledged continuing government support in the ongoing fight against litter.
The competition will run for eight weeks commencing on the 8th June.
The current holders of the titles of the most litter free town and village in County Cork are Clonakility and Innishannon respectively.


ON YOUR MARK! GET READY! GO !!

Mark Kennedy of 57 Glenside, Pinecroft, Grange, Douglas, is to cycle from Minsk the capital of Belarus to Malech a distance of 160 miles in aid of a children's sanatorium, which treats 270 children for the effects of Thyroid disorders and other related illnesses due to the fall out from Chernobyl. Leaving from Shannon on the 29th September, Mark would like to thank everybody who has sponsored him so far. These include the Douglas GAA Club finance committee and the Douglas GAA Bowlers club to mention just a few. All donations are greatly appreciated and can be given to Mark at home ( 894277) or the Douglas GAA Club(895559)


SWILKEN OF ST. ANDREWS

St. Andrews in Scotland was where it all began more than 100 years ago when an Open Championship was played for the first time on the historic Old Course.
One of the worlds leading gold club manufacturers, Swilken of St. Andrews, was the largest producer of clubs in the town for more than a quarter of a century, but were the inheritors of two club-making legends, who started it almost a century ago, George Nicholl and Tom Stewart.
The company, which was named after the Swilken Burn (a creek crossing the famous Old Course) produced traditional, custom-made and specialised clubs and enjoyed a global reputation for innovation and craftsmanship. The company’s logo was the Swilken bridge, te stone span of which has been crossed by all the great names in the history of golf before heading back to the magnificent clubhouse of the Royal and Ancient Golf club, the game’s headquarters.
The bridge is over 800 years old. It was once the only pathway from the west between the ecclesiastical stronghold and the towns harbour. It was used by traders to bring their goods into St. Andrews and it was also the access to the links where locals used to indulge in their peculiar game of ‘golfe’ or ‘gowf’. The burn was also used by women to wash cloths, spreading them on the fairway to dry.
The Swilken Golf Company grew out of the ashes of Spalding, which was also the owner of the old St. Andrews firm of Tom Steward, manufacturers of the Pipe brand irons, which were used in every country in the world where golf was played. Most of the leading golfers in the first three decades of this century, including Old Tom Morris, Ben Sayers, Bobby Jones and Tommy Armour used the Pipe brand clubs. When Swilken took over they employed the nucleus of the Steward craftsmen. It was the skills of such craftsmen, whose knowledge has been handed from generation to generation that gave Swilken a world-renowned reputation.
Swilken hit the headlines in the 1980’s with the first of a number of special projects, the limited-edition manufacture of clubs cast in magnificent bronze alloy from the original 32.5 ton propellers of the ocean liner, Qe2. A second innovation involved the production of a limited-edition set of clubs made from the propellers of the Royal Yacht Britannia.


IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

by Declan Cronin of Apex Clinic
Over the years my symptoms have steadily worsened and the only way I feel I can relieve the swelling and pain in my tummy is to soak myself in a warm bath and then go to bed with a hot water bottle and place it on my tummy for the night. I am a very optimistic person but sometimes the pain and bloating can be so intense that I often wonder if I will ever feel well again. However, I have made a resolution that I will not let Irritable Bowel Syndrome rule my life and so when my friends ask me to go for a meal I do go, even though I might be in severe pain. I will not let my symptoms control my life and due to your informative articles I am not as embarrassed as I used to be and I have found it easier to tell people how I am feeling. Thanks a million! Patricia.
Comment: Last week I encouraged people to phone and voice an opinion as to whether the articles on Irritable Bowel Syndrome should continue. We are delighted with the response we got and very encouraged by the favourable comments. In all we received forty-seven calls and letters with forty-two in favour with the continuation of the status quo. The majority of the callers reported that they themselves suffer from irritable Bowel Syndrome or that they know someone that does. For those who took the time out to respond I would like to sincerely thank them. Shortly I will be conducting a controlled pilot study on the positive effects psychotherapy can have on Irritable Bowel Syndrome,
The closing date for those who want to partake in this study is June 23. The costs of this study will be totally absorbed by the Apex Clinic. The findings of this study will be published in the Douglas Weekly. In September I will be conducting a controlled pilot study on the positive effects psychotherapy can have on depression.
More next week!


DOUGLAS SWIMMING POOL

In relation to the current Consultant's Report in favour of closure of the Douglas Swimming Pool, I have been contacted by residents who voice their opposition to such a move.
Remember, once the Pool is closed there is no guarantee that a Pool will be built elsewhere. It has been stated that 30% of users of Bishopstown Pool are from Douglas. That is a fine base to turn the pool around. If it was upgraded and refurbished as a Leisure Centre with Gym and Coffee Shop I am confident that it would be a wonderful asset for the future. Once it is gone, it is gone forever.
The following points are worth noting:
It is not just an amenity issue, it is a health issue. It is an amenity which can benefit the young;the elderly;male and female. There is ample parking at the existing pool. People from Douglas Grange Frankfield Rochestown Blackrock Mahon would, I feel, use the facilities once they were upgraded. Joining private Leisure Centres is not an option open to everyone. Families have many expenses already and may not have enough for private centres. We are told young and old must exercise more - what better way than by swimming - it is good for the heart, lungs and the psyche. We can't quantify such an amenity on money grounds alone, the issue is far wider than that.
The number of schools in the catchment area who would benefit. It would also be a great training ground for future olympic hopefuls.
Minister for Tourism for Sport & Recreation, Jim McDaid TD recently stated that he had ample funds to give away - why hasn't the Corporation made such an application. What do they want to do with the site?
What we need now is to react positively. Such funding to expand and enhance the facilities that are there. Central Government; Southern Health Board Department of Education; Corporation and perhaps a private element could come together to keep the Douglas Pool.
I have been contacted by many for support to keep it open. Not one contacted me to close it. The Corporation councillors that I have spoken to do not want it to close. But unless people sit up and act now, yet another amenity will be washed away with the tide. Urban tide!
Deirdre Forde.


THE MUSIC MAN

John Russell, the popular and well known entertainment promoter has set up a brand New Entertainment Agency, called Gold Byte Ltd. Probably best known for his close association with Ardmanning House and with the Togher Festival, John has always been at the forefront of the promotion business. Over the years he has helped clubs organise their functions and helped charity groups to raise funds. Whenever there is a worthy cause, John doesn't hesitate to organise a benefit night. In fact everybody in the Togher area knows that when it comes to organising entertainment John Russell is the man! Now John is to extend his services to include all of us. So from now on if you need a band or a Disco for a Wedding or a 21st. Whether it's Karaoke or a D.J, a dinner dance or an office party, whatever your entertainment needs, just call John Russell at 021-968738 / 086 8624 383


DOUGLAS YOUNG PEOPLE TO EXPERIENCE FOROIGE

The Douglas Foroige Club Experience Programme is a four-week programme, which will involve Outdoor activities, teamwork, confidence building and young people having a safe place to socialise under the guidance of trained voluntary leaders. The programme is open to the 6th class students of the local primary schools. Foroige is the National Youth Development Organisation which seeks to foster the self e~1eem of young people and involve Young people in caring for and contributing to their own community
Their First Meeting is on Thursday 15th June in Douglas Community Centre from 7.30pm to 9,00pm


SAD DAYS NOW, FOR CHRISTMAS DOGS

The Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCAI sees the problem of unwanted dogs increasing each year, and the situation doesn't seem to be improving. - "The situation doesn't appear to be changing, the numbers aren't going down despite our education campaigns," says Ciaran 0'Donovan of the ISPCA. "Every year over 25,000 unwanted dogs are put down. That's just in dog pounds - it doesn't take into account dogs who are taken to vets or die by the side of the road. Many of those animals are sick or dying anyway, but the figure is still just the tip of the iceberg." Ciaran explains that if a stray dog is not claimed within 5 days, it's either re-homed or put down - usually the latter.
"The ISPCA would like to see a national spaying and neutering scheme," he continues. -'Neutering can be expensive - we provide grants to pet owners in some areas but we couldn't subsidise a nation-wide scheme. We'd like to see it subsidised by the Government. We've had talks with Ministers and they are considering it at the moment."
In Claran's view the problem is likely to continue. "The scheme would reduce the numbers, but you'd never eliminate the problem entirely. There are more dogs out there than people who want them," he says.


ON THE ROUNDABOUT

Simon COVENEY TD MCC CALLS FOR A NATIONAL IDENTIFICATION CARD SCHEME TO TACKLE UNDERAGE DRINKING………..back by popular demand at the Granary Theatre is the Eachtra Theatre Company's production of "Cycles". Running from June 13th to the 17th ..


BURIED TREASURE IN DOUGLAS?

"The labourer, to whom Mr. Carroll had addressed himself, thought his Advice most sensible and spoke to his fellow-workers accordingly, as their time for dispersion was at hand; and we wended our way from Castletreasure hill under the cheers of approbation and shouts of good wishes, uttered by the followers of Shelah the Dreamer, whose popularity was evidently on the wane. The hag stood, uttering maledictions, and I shall never forget her gestures, when Mr. Carroll told me to look back. She had seized like a tigress the man, with whom he had conversed, by the throat; and was flourishing wildly her formidable staff above his head." The labourer followed them to Carrigaline and Myrtleville. In the evening he joined them at Templebreedy, overlooking the entrance to Cork Harbour. After begging pardon for the interruption, he inquired if it was true that the gold was buried a spade's depth and would Mr. Carroll help in the digging! If gold was found, he would build a stone and slated house on the farm. Mr. Carroll advised him first to clear and manure the ground and that the results would give him as much gold as if he had actually found the crock of gold. With profuse thanks, the man withdrew. In the autumn of 1816, the same man called to Mr. Carroll's medical shop in the North Main Street. He informed Mr. Carroll that with his three sons - 'fine, hardworking wholesome looking fellows as anyone would wish to see' he had rented Castletreasure Farm. It was an improving farm and please God, they were all likely to do well and improve there. Mr. Carroll then extracted a tooth or two. As payment for the extraction and for the advice on Castletreasure Farm, the man offered a circular piece of thin gold plate. The plate was marked by a Maltese cross in the centre; between the cross and the edge, there were six concentric circles. The piece weighed l dwt. 10 grains. Good humouredly, Mr. Carroll accepted this unusual fee. When he was next in the Douglas area, Mr. Carroll made enquiries about his former patient. He was quickly informed that the poor labourer became a rich man in twelve months - no one knew how. The man himself studiously avoided all inquiries as to his newly found wealth.
Collectors of coins and antiquities in Cork were anxious to see 'this curious bit of money.' The gold plate passed from hand to hand until it was forgotten who was the possessor. "In 1845, to my extreme surprise, I recognised what I believed to be this identical gold plate, in a pocketcase which the late Mr. Redmond Anthony of Pilitown had had fitted up in London for a small but valuable collection of Irish antiquities formed by him. The plate was labelled 'Found at Castletreasure, near Douglas, Cork.' He did not recollect how he procured it and lamented that it occupied so much space, so that he wished for a ring or other such small article instead. On my requesting him to select one from my collection of (mostly) Irish rings, he took one intrinsically the most valuable - a family relic that had been given to me but, although I parted from it with regret, I could not refrain from making the exchange offered, which recalled all my early associations of Castle Treasure hill, with the dewy freshness of that morning, just one and thirty years previously."
Note: Local inhabitants state that, in later years, when farm workers were engaged in clearing briars on the lands of Castletreasure, some caves were unearthed in which were found cooking utensils of Danish origin. Crofton Croker's collection was sold in December 1854, shortly after his death. As the following correspondence will show, further enquiries about the ultimate location of the Castletreasure gold plate have not met with any great success.

National Museum
"I am afraid that l am of little, if indeed any, help to you... The disc you mention passed through so many hands that no one knew where it had gone until Crofton Croker found it again in Mr. Anthony's collection. Much of his material went to Robert Day, but it was not in Day's collection when auctioned in London. I do not know of a disc with a band of six concentric circles on it but we have discs from Cloyne, Ballydehob a gold plate from Castlemartyr. None of these however, can be the Castletreasure piece. Prof. M.J. O'Kelly of University College, Cork, might be able to help you; he could say perhaps, what happened to individual items from Croker's Collection.

Department of Archaeology, University College, Cork.
"Crofton Croker's collection of antiquities were sold by public auction in London in 1859, and went to several private buyers as well as to the British Museum and Trinity College, Dublin. Otherwise, I have no information at the moment as to the whereabouts of the Castletreasure gold plate.”

The British Museum, London.
"We do possess one item from Castle Treasure, Douglas; it was bought by the Museum in 1854, and has the registration number 54,12-27.2. The object is a small gold disk, 1 3/4 ins. diameter, with a lightly -incised cross. It is of Bronze Age date. I can find no other material from this site in our collections, though we do have a number of items, mostly of the Bronze Age, from County Cork in general."
An enquiry to the Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London,
contrary to information, brought only negative results.

From ' A history of Douglas' by Con Foley,
continued from last week ...


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