Carrigeen

Choose a townsland from the map:


List of townslands

List of Townslands

Townsland
Acres
Aglish North 235
Aglish South 291
Curraghmartin 153
Cussana 58
Mountneill 315
Portnahully 288
Ballygorey 488
Clasharoe 56
Corluddy 331
Cussana 124
Glengrant 72
Licketstown 342
Luffany 444
Moonveen 326
Portnascully 396
Ballincurra 59
Ballinlough 53
Ballymountain 89
Clonassy 341
Dungooly 352
Farranmacedmond 140
Listrolin 699
Rathkieran 319
Rochestown 486
Curraghmartin --
Rathcurby North
124
Rathcurby South 277
Ashgrove --

Back to Map

Carrigeen

Carrigeen is situated just two miles from Mooncoin. There is a school, shop, creamery, community hall and church located in Carrigeen. Originally, Carrigeen was just a tiny area in the townsland of Corluddy. However, with the building of the first church here cir 1700 the village became a focal point for the area, overtaking Rathkieran. The current church in Carrigeen, dedicated to St Kevin, was built in 1893 on the exact same site of the previous church which was built in 1801. There was another church on the site built around 1700.

St. Kevins church, Carrigeen
carrigeen hall
Carrigeen grotto Carrigeen Cremery
Carrigeen Church
Carrigeen hall
Carrigeen Grotto
Carrigeen/Ballinlough Cremery

Back to Map


Rathcurby

Rathcurby bridge Rathcurby bridge
Rathcurby
Rathcurby

Back to Map


Dungooley

James Irish, Dungooley, Wedding. 1952

Back to Map


Farranmacedmond / Ballymountain

From Irish, Ballymountain; Baile na Mointeain - Town of the little Bog.

Back to Map


Rathkieran(319 acres)

Rathkieran (St Kierans Fort or Rath) was once the main church for the whole area (mentioned in Ossary records as early as 1180) and can be considered the original focal point for the area. The ruins of a church and graveyard can still be seen there today (built 1727). This church was Church of Ireland/Protestant but before the Reformation there would have been a Catholic church here. From the 1700s onwards, because of the fairly good relationship between the two religions, many Catholics were also given permission to be buried at Rathkieran cemetry (and would have attended mass as there was not always places for them to worship). There has been many churches on this site. The present ruins are from a church built in 1727. Much of the ruins were removed in cir 1880 for safety reasons as the walls were said to be unstable. A dramatic arch which was the main entrance, is all that remains.

Rathkieran Church
Rathkieran Graveyard
Rathkieran towards comeraghs
Rathkieran Quarry
Rathkieran Church
Rathkieran Graveyard
Rathkieran looking towards the Comeraghs (windmills in place since 2008)
Rathkieran Quarry (site of old 'Carraig').

Back to Map


Portnascully

From Irish, 'Scullys Port', port is an ancient word for fortress, so 'Scullys Fortress'. A recorded entry in a religious book from 1240 states that 'Polsculi' had a castle, chapel and mill. It states that the church was part of the castle. There is remnants of an old church here, with graveyard. This church would have been Anglican/Church of Ireland after the Reformation. The feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin is the feast day of Portnascully.

Portnascully
Portnascully
Portnascully Mill pond
Portnascully Church. A church in this area was first mentioned in 1240 which was attached to a castle.

Back to Map


Luffany

From Irish, it is translated as 'the wetland'. Made up of Luffany village, New and Old Luffany. Its is a picturesque area, with one of the highest instances of thatch houses in Kilkenny (due the proximity of the river where the reeds are sourced). For such a small area, it has produced a number of famous inhabitants. Dr Walsh, one of the most popular Bishops of Ossary was born there. The village also has many all ireland hurling medals accumulated by a number of different inhabitants. It must have one of the highest proportion of all ireland medals per capita of population!

Watty Dunphy from Luffany village won an all ireland in 1922 and was the first kilkenny man to lift the newly acquired Liam Mccarthy cup as captain. He was also the first person to captain Leinster to a Railway cup win in 1927. His nephew Joe Dunphy holds another unique distinction of captaining two All Ireland Minor winning teams. Still the only person to do that. Next up is Eddie Doyle also from Luffany village, who captained Kilkenny to another All Ireland senior title in 1933. He also took part in the Sinnotts Cross Ambush in 1922. His son Noel founded Suir Electric.

luffany
Luffany
Luffany

Back to Map


Ballynamountain (Ballymountain)

From Irish, Baile na Móinteain, meaning 'Town of the Little Bog'.

Back to Map


Ballygorey

From Irish, Ballygorey translates as 'O Guaires town'.

View from Upper Ballygorey

Back to Map


Corluddy

Famous for its castle. The castle was the stronghold of the Grant family who were Constables of the Barony of Iverk. The castle was confiscated from the family by Oliver Cromwell in 1653, as they were Catholics and refused to convert. The families owned castles in Corluddy, Poleroan and Ballinaboley in Kilmacow. David Grant was then transplanted to Connaught in 1654. Up to 60 members of the extended Grant family were transplated at this time.

Corluddy Castle Corluddy Castle Corluddy Castle
Corluddy Castle 1
Corluddy Castle 2
Corluddy Castle 3

Back to Map


Aglish

From Irish, Aglish simply means 'the church'. There is only some small remnants of the old church and graveyard in the area. In its last use, the church would have been Church of Ireland. In the 'Red book of Ossary' (1600s), it appears as 'Ballymartyn', which could be in relation to St Martin. Hence this is why in old records we see the full name of Aglish as 'Aglishmartin' i.e. St Martins Church.

Aglish Aglish
Aglish
Aglish

Back to Map


Curraghmartin

From Irish, meaning is 'Martins Moor'. It is not recorded if this is a specific Martin or 'St Martin' which corresponds to Aglishmartin, which it is taught references St Martin.

Back to Map


Portnahully

From Irish, 'Bank or Fort of the Rock'.

Back to Map


Mountneill

From Irish, 'Baile salac/slóch' or 'Dirty town'.

mountneill mountneill
Mountneill
View from Mountneill

Back to Map


Cussana

From Irish, literaly means 'Full of Paths'.

Back to Map


Licketstown

From Irish,' the town of Licket' (Licket being an English surname).

Licketstown
Licketstown Licketstown
View from Licketstown towards the new Suir Bridge ('the cat flap')
Licketstown horses

Back to Map


Glengrant

Literally meaning 'Grants glen'. This is the most southerly point in County Kilkenny and also the most southerly point in Ossary, which stretches as far north as County Offaly. The Grants were a very powerful family in the area (Corluddy and Polerones castle was theirs), up until 1653 when they forfeited there lands by not siding with Oliver Cromwell. They moved to Connaught subsequently and are listed in the 'transplantees' on the History page of this site.

Glengrant Glengrant 2 Glengrant house
View from Glengrant
Glengrant Village

Back to Map


Moonveen

Moonveen
View from Moonveen in the south of the parish

Back to Map